Books
Anatomy of Fear

by Jonathan Santlofer
William Morrow, April 2007, $24.95

Nate Rodriguez isn't quite sure who he is. His mother was Jewish, his father from Puerto Rico and, though he followed his father's footsteps into the NYPD, he quickly learned that the streets weren't for him. Instead, he has become a sketch artist who is able to coax visual information out of crime victims, drawing on memories they didn't know they had. Unfortunately, he's dogged by guilty memories of his own that he would rather erase.When someone starts killing people in racially-mixed relationships and leaving drawings at the scene, Nate seems uniquely qualified to assist with the investigation. He's able to get inside the head of the killer, who plans his assassinations in detail and draws them in advance. In fact, Nate's gift for insight begins to resemble the Second Sight that his Santeria-practicing grandmother uses to protect him. Before long, he's more connected to the killer than he wants to be--just as the police begin to question whether their sketch artist might be committing the crimes himself.Billed as a "novel of visual suspense," Santlofer has redrawn familiar serial-killer motifs with an artist's eye, and the book is illustrated with sketches scattered throughout the nicely-designed text. Rodriguez is a compelling character. The story itself, which draws on well-worn serial killer plotlines including interspersed scenes from the killer's point of view, is nothing new, but Rodriguez, his empathy, and his handy sketchpad provide a fresh perspective.

Barbara Fister

Nate Rodriguez isn't quite sure who he is. His mother was Jewish, his father from Puerto Rico and, though he followed his father's footsteps into the NYPD, he quickly learned that the streets weren't for him. Instead, he has become a sketch artist who is able to coax visual information out of crime victims, drawing on memories they didn't know they had. Unfortunately, he's dogged by guilty memories of his own that he would rather erase.When someone starts killing people in racially-mixed relationships and leaving drawings at the scene, Nate seems uniquely qualified to assist with the investigation. He's able to get inside the head of the killer, who plans his assassinations in detail and draws them in advance. In fact, Nate's gift for insight begins to resemble the Second Sight that his Santeria-practicing grandmother uses to protect him. Before long, he's more connected to the killer than he wants to be--just as the police begin to question whether their sketch artist might be committing the crimes himself.Billed as a "novel of visual suspense," Santlofer has redrawn familiar serial-killer motifs with an artist's eye, and the book is illustrated with sketches scattered throughout the nicely-designed text. Rodriguez is a compelling character. The story itself, which draws on well-worn serial killer plotlines including interspersed scenes from the killer's point of view, is nothing new, but Rodriguez, his empathy, and his handy sketchpad provide a fresh perspective.

Xav ID 1
876

by Jonathan Santlofer
William Morrow, April 2007, $24.95

Santlofer
April 2007
anatomy-of-fear
24.95
William Morrow