Sunday, 02 January 2011 15:03
altSo many tourists, so many scenes in Venice, so much confusion.

When I first saw the previews of The Tourist, the movie starring Johnny Depp and Angelina Jolie, left, I wondered, is this the same The Tourist based on the 2009 novel by
Olen Steinhauer.

It certainly has a lot of similarities -- Venice, clandestine meetings, spies, and the most beautiful people trying to protect the world since, well, James Bond's last movie.

I wasn't the only reader who was confused.
The Depp/Jolie Tourist movie is about an American tourist named Frank who is an American tourist visiting Italy and gets caught up in espionage when he meets the beautiful Elise. It is based on an original screenplay.
alt
Steinhauer's excellent novel is about a clandestine branch of the CIA whose deep undercover agents call themselves Tourists. Milo Weaver is a black-ops agent who wants to get out of the business and devote time to his wife and 6-year-old stepdaughter. Naturally, he agrees to do one last job for the agency. (Where have you heard that plot spin before?)
Steinhauer's The Tourist is the start of a projected triology. The Nearest Exit, the second novel in the mini series, was published a couple of months ago.
This is where the confusion starts.
Steinhauer's novel The Tourist has been optioned by George Clooney who plans to play Milo. According to as many Websites I could find, The Steinhauer/Clooney Tourist is being planned for a 2012 release.
Remember that word "planned" so many novels are optioned but the film version runs only in someone's head, not the screen.
So will The Steinhauer/Clooney Tourist be a real visitor or an accidental tourist?
Who knows.
Steinhauer's novel is a multi-layered novel filled with political intrigue and human agnst of a man who had done some terrible things in the name of his country and just wanted a quiet life. I reviewed the novel very favorably and it was one of my favorite books of 2009.
I would imagine that when and/or if The Steinhauer/Clooney Tourist makes it to the screen, The Depp/Jolie Tourist will be long forgotten, expect by extreme fans of the actors. (Should anyone care, I am a Depp fan.)
Oh, and let's make it even more interesting. Earlier in 2009, George Clooney starred in The American, based on a novel by Martin Booth. That plot also has some similiar aspects -- "an assassin hides out in Italy for one last assignment."
So many tourists, so little ways to keep them straight.
Is 'the Tourist' the Tourist?
Oline Cogdill
is-the-tourist-the-tourist
altSo many tourists, so many scenes in Venice, so much confusion.

When I first saw the previews of The Tourist, the movie starring Johnny Depp and Angelina Jolie, left, I wondered, is this the same The Tourist based on the 2009 novel by
Olen Steinhauer.

It certainly has a lot of similarities -- Venice, clandestine meetings, spies, and the most beautiful people trying to protect the world since, well, James Bond's last movie.

I wasn't the only reader who was confused.
The Depp/Jolie Tourist movie is about an American tourist named Frank who is an American tourist visiting Italy and gets caught up in espionage when he meets the beautiful Elise. It is based on an original screenplay.
alt
Steinhauer's excellent novel is about a clandestine branch of the CIA whose deep undercover agents call themselves Tourists. Milo Weaver is a black-ops agent who wants to get out of the business and devote time to his wife and 6-year-old stepdaughter. Naturally, he agrees to do one last job for the agency. (Where have you heard that plot spin before?)
Steinhauer's The Tourist is the start of a projected triology. The Nearest Exit, the second novel in the mini series, was published a couple of months ago.
This is where the confusion starts.
Steinhauer's novel The Tourist has been optioned by George Clooney who plans to play Milo. According to as many Websites I could find, The Steinhauer/Clooney Tourist is being planned for a 2012 release.
Remember that word "planned" so many novels are optioned but the film version runs only in someone's head, not the screen.
So will The Steinhauer/Clooney Tourist be a real visitor or an accidental tourist?
Who knows.
Steinhauer's novel is a multi-layered novel filled with political intrigue and human agnst of a man who had done some terrible things in the name of his country and just wanted a quiet life. I reviewed the novel very favorably and it was one of my favorite books of 2009.
I would imagine that when and/or if The Steinhauer/Clooney Tourist makes it to the screen, The Depp/Jolie Tourist will be long forgotten, expect by extreme fans of the actors. (Should anyone care, I am a Depp fan.)
Oh, and let's make it even more interesting. Earlier in 2009, George Clooney starred in The American, based on a novel by Martin Booth. That plot also has some similiar aspects -- "an assassin hides out in Italy for one last assignment."
So many tourists, so little ways to keep them straight.
Thursday, 30 December 2010 00:09
This is the time of year when people make lists for gifts -- for Christmas, Hannukah, Kwanzaa or whatever you celebrate.
This also is the time when critics, bloggers, newspapers and more make separate lists -- for their best of the year picks.
Now tell me you haven't seen at least four different lists of best mysteries of the year -- and none of those lists have the same books.
And we haven't even gotten to the Edgar Awards nominations, which will be announced in January, or the Agatha nominations, or the flurry of other best lists.
Sometimes it seems as if these lists aren't even about books published in the same year. They can be that different.
I say these lists are good a thing. These different opinions show how unique each reader is. How one novel is one reader's treasure but can be another's trash. How we each want a different experience when we read. Some of us love foreign mysteries, others prefer the lighter than light novels.
These different views also prove that it was a good year for readers. 2010 may have been a bad year in many ways, certainly for many countries' economy. But it was a very good year for readers with so many good, solid mysteries being published.
I also know it was a good year because it was difficult for me to narrow down my choices to just my top 20 and 5 debuts. So many good mysteries just had to be left off the list.
So, as 2010 draws to a close, enjoy the variety of lists. My list ran in the Sun-Sentinel in Fort Lauderdale and various others place. My list is, of course, the only list you should pay attention to.
The Mystery Scene family wishes each of our readers a Happy New Year. We hope that 2011 will be filled with health, personal satisfaction, professional success and everything you desire.
Happy reading to each of you. We'll be back next year...which is just a couple of days from now.
The Season of Lists
Oline Cogdill
the-season-of-lists
This is the time of year when people make lists for gifts -- for Christmas, Hannukah, Kwanzaa or whatever you celebrate.
This also is the time when critics, bloggers, newspapers and more make separate lists -- for their best of the year picks.
Now tell me you haven't seen at least four different lists of best mysteries of the year -- and none of those lists have the same books.
And we haven't even gotten to the Edgar Awards nominations, which will be announced in January, or the Agatha nominations, or the flurry of other best lists.
Sometimes it seems as if these lists aren't even about books published in the same year. They can be that different.
I say these lists are good a thing. These different opinions show how unique each reader is. How one novel is one reader's treasure but can be another's trash. How we each want a different experience when we read. Some of us love foreign mysteries, others prefer the lighter than light novels.
These different views also prove that it was a good year for readers. 2010 may have been a bad year in many ways, certainly for many countries' economy. But it was a very good year for readers with so many good, solid mysteries being published.
I also know it was a good year because it was difficult for me to narrow down my choices to just my top 20 and 5 debuts. So many good mysteries just had to be left off the list.
So, as 2010 draws to a close, enjoy the variety of lists. My list ran in the Sun-Sentinel in Fort Lauderdale and various others place. My list is, of course, the only list you should pay attention to.
The Mystery Scene family wishes each of our readers a Happy New Year. We hope that 2011 will be filled with health, personal satisfaction, professional success and everything you desire.
Happy reading to each of you. We'll be back next year...which is just a couple of days from now.
Wednesday, 22 December 2010 10:56
altLooking for that last minute holiday gift? One that the mystery lover on your list will use and not want to return? How about the person on your list who is writing a novel and needs a jumpstart on their writing?
Or how about a gift for you?
Think about the 2011 Sleuthfest.
Think about Fort Lauderdale in March.
Then make your plans to come.
Unlike other conferences, Sleuthfest is a writing conference, geared to aspiring writers and published authors. And fans are welcomed, too.
Sleuthfest, sponsored by the Florida chapter of the Mystery Writers of America, begins March 3, 2011, with the Third Degree Workshop and continues March 4-6. Editors, agents, authors and forensic experts will be on hand to discuss writing.
If your holiday gift list includes mystery fans and would-be authors, Sleuthfest registration makes a good present.
Early registration is $235 until Jan. 15, 2011, and $255 after that date for MWA members; for nonmembers, the early rate is $255 and then, after Jan. 15, 2011,
it rises to $275. The rate includes some meals. One-day attendance also is available. Information and registration is at www.sleuthfest.com.
altAs in years past, Sleuthfest will feature two guests of honor. Meg Gardiner, author of “The Liar's Lullaby” and “The Dirty Secrets Club,” will be the Friday guest. Gardiner won the 2009 Edgar award for Best Paperback Original for her novel “China Lake.” Long published in England, Gardiner first came to the attention of American readers when Stephen King praised her work in an Entertainment Weekly column.
Multi-award winner Dennis Lehane, author of “Mystic River,” “Gone Baby Gone” and “Shutter Island,” will be the guest of honor Saturday. Lehane built his career with Boston private detectives Patrick Kenzie and Angie Gennaro, who returned in his recent novel “Moonlight Mile.”
In addition, mystery authors S.J. Rozan, James W. Hall, Ace Atkins, Michael Koryta, Dana Cameron, Deborah Crombie, Lisa Unger, Julie Compton, Marcia Talley, and more will attend.
Sleuthfest a Real Gift
Oline Cogdill
sleuthfest-a-real-gift
altLooking for that last minute holiday gift? One that the mystery lover on your list will use and not want to return? How about the person on your list who is writing a novel and needs a jumpstart on their writing?
Or how about a gift for you?
Think about the 2011 Sleuthfest.
Think about Fort Lauderdale in March.
Then make your plans to come.
Unlike other conferences, Sleuthfest is a writing conference, geared to aspiring writers and published authors. And fans are welcomed, too.
Sleuthfest, sponsored by the Florida chapter of the Mystery Writers of America, begins March 3, 2011, with the Third Degree Workshop and continues March 4-6. Editors, agents, authors and forensic experts will be on hand to discuss writing.
If your holiday gift list includes mystery fans and would-be authors, Sleuthfest registration makes a good present.
Early registration is $235 until Jan. 15, 2011, and $255 after that date for MWA members; for nonmembers, the early rate is $255 and then, after Jan. 15, 2011,
it rises to $275. The rate includes some meals. One-day attendance also is available. Information and registration is at www.sleuthfest.com.
altAs in years past, Sleuthfest will feature two guests of honor. Meg Gardiner, author of “The Liar's Lullaby” and “The Dirty Secrets Club,” will be the Friday guest. Gardiner won the 2009 Edgar award for Best Paperback Original for her novel “China Lake.” Long published in England, Gardiner first came to the attention of American readers when Stephen King praised her work in an Entertainment Weekly column.
Multi-award winner Dennis Lehane, author of “Mystic River,” “Gone Baby Gone” and “Shutter Island,” will be the guest of honor Saturday. Lehane built his career with Boston private detectives Patrick Kenzie and Angie Gennaro, who returned in his recent novel “Moonlight Mile.”
In addition, mystery authors S.J. Rozan, James W. Hall, Ace Atkins, Michael Koryta, Dana Cameron, Deborah Crombie, Lisa Unger, Julie Compton, Marcia Talley, and more will attend.