Saturday, 01 December 2018 15:45


We always look forward to the announcement of the Grand Master, Raven, and Ellery Queen honorees by the Mystery Writers of America (MWA).

Usually we try to rewrite press releases, but not this time.

Martin Cruz Smith was awarded the 2019 Grand Master by Mystery Writers of America (MWA).

MWA’s Grand Master Award represents the pinnacle of achievement in mystery writing and was established to acknowledge important contributions to this genre, as well as for a body of work that is both significant and of consistent high quality.

Smith will receive his award at the 73rd Annual Edgar Awards Banquet, which will be held at the Grand Hyatt Hotel in New York City on April 25, 2019.

Martin Cruz Smith, the son of a jazz musician and a Native American chanteuse, is perhaps best known for his eight-novel series featuring Arkady Renko, who first appeared in Gorky Park. That book was turned into an award-winning motion picture starring William Hurt and Lee Marvin.

Even before his breakout with the Arkady series, Smith had received two Edgar nominations for books in his Roman Gray series, Gypsy in Amber (1971) and Canto for a Gypsy (1972). Both books were originally published under his birth name, Martin Smith, but when he learned that there were six other Martin Smiths who wrote novels he adopted Cruz, his paternal grandmother's surname, to differentiate himself. Smith also received an Edgar nomination in 1978 for Nightwing, a standalone that drew upon his own tribal ancestry, and has written more than 30 novels in a career that spans nearly five decades.

“When I was a mere strip of a 'gunsel', I attended the 1971 Mystery Writers Edgar Award dinner,” Smith said when informed of the honor. “I was overwhelmed to be in the presence of talents like Dick Francis, Donald Westlake, and Ross Macdonald. Once again, I find myself in the company of wonderful mystery writers at the height of their talent. I'm knocked out, floored, and honored. Spasibo.”

The Raven Award recognizes outstanding achievement in the mystery field outside the realm of creative writing. Marilyn Stasio will receive the 2019 Raven Award.

Stasio has been the mystery critic for the New York Times Book Review (and other magazines) for 30 years—since 1988—with hundreds of books coming under her loving, unforgiving, eye. Whether her judgment is elegiac or brutal, when it comes to the mystery genre, a Stasio review is a thing to be treasured or feared, but always learned from.

Stasio commented, “Goodness, I feel like Sally Field. (‘Wow! You like me! You actually like me!’) When I think of the great people the MWA has honored in the past—people like Edward Gorey and Vincent Price—I want to duck behind the door. My only wish is that those great guys were still around to hand me the Raven, which I promise to treasure.”

Previous Raven winners include the Raven Bookstore in Lawrence, Kansas, Dru Ann Love, Kris Zgorski, Sisters in Crime, Margaret Kinsman, Kathryn Kennison, Jon and Ruth Jordan, Aunt Agatha’s Bookstore in Ann Arbor, Michigan, Oline Cogdill, Molly Weston, The Mysterious Galaxy in San Diego, Centuries & Sleuths Bookstore in Chicago, Once Upon a Crime Bookstore in Minneapolis, Mystery Lovers Bookstore in Oakmont, PA, Kate’s Mystery Books in Cambridge, MA, and The Poe House in Baltimore, MD.

The Ellery Queen Award was established in 1983 to honor “outstanding writing teams and outstanding people in the mystery-publishing industry.” This year the Board chose to honor Linda Landrigan.

Landrigan came to Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine in 1997 as an associate editor and has been its editor since 2002. Under her leadership, the magazine has not only continued to thrive but has also navigated dramatic changes in the publishing industry—she has overseen the introduction of AHHM in digital formats as well as the creation of a podcast series featuring audio recordings of stories from the magazine as well as interviews with authors.

On learning she would receive the Ellery Queen Award, Landrigan said, “This is such a great honor, and I am really humbled to be in the company of the other Ellery Queen Award recipients who have come before. At Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine we strive to publish the best mystery and crime stories to satisfy our readership. It’s gratifying that so many people are producing great stories and that so many people are eager to read them. I am happy that we can introduce new voices in the genre, and continue to offer our readers stories from their favorite authors as well. Thanks to MWA for this honor and for your support of the community of mystery writers, publishers, and readers.”

Previous Ellery Queen Award winners include Robert Pépin, Neil Nyren, Janet Rudolph, Charles Ardai, Joe Meyers, Barbara Peters and Robert Rosenwald, Brian Skupin and Kate Stine, Carolyn Marino, Ed Gorman, Janet Hutchings, Cathleen Jordan, Douglas G. Greene, Susanne Kirk, Sara Ann Freed, Hiroshi Hayakawa, Jacques Barzun, Martin Greenburg, Otto Penzler, Richard Levinson, William Link, Ruth Cavin, and Emma Lathen.

The Edgar Awards, or “Edgars,” as they are commonly known, are named after MWA’s patron saint Edgar Allan Poe and are presented to authors of distinguished work in various categories. MWA is the premier organization for mystery writers, professionals allied to the crime-writing field, aspiring crime writers, and those who are devoted to the genre. The organization encompasses some 3,000 members including authors of fiction and nonfiction books, screen and television writers, as well as publishers, editors, and literary agents. For more information on Mystery Writers of America, please visit the website: www.mysterywriters.org




MWA Announces 2019 Grand Master, Raven, Ellery Queen Award Recipients
Mystery Scene
mwa-announces-2019-grand-master-raven-ellery-queen-award-recipients
Thursday, 29 November 2018 16:37

Carrie Smith is the author of the Claire Codella novels centering on NYPD Detective Codella. In the first book, Claire is returning from cancer treatment and she encounters some jealousy (she’d solved a high profile case before taking sick leave). In all the books, Smith embraces characters of all stripes and really delves into them, creating the kind of character-driven police novel that I as a reader truly enjoy. I also see echoes of a favorite writer of mine, Lillian O’Donnell, whose novels, beginning in the '70s, traced the path of a female cop and eventual NYPD detective as she encounters sexism as well as skepticism on the job. Both these characters get the job done with smarts and compassion.

You have established a wonderful series character in Claire, and now you are moving away from her. Are you done telling her story?

For the moment, but not forever. Claire is by now an old friend and I have no intention to abandon her. She has evolved dramatically since Chapter 1 of Silent City, when she returned to the NYPD after a 10-month battle with cancer and began to prove herself all over again. She’s confronted demons of her past, solved three high-profile cases, and reached a new place in her personal life. But there are unanswered questions, too. Who will replace her nemesis, Lieutenant McGowan? Will her relationship with Detective Brian Haggerty grow stronger, or will it founder? Can she keep up her breakneck pace without another health crisis? There’s more to Claire’s story, and there are endless pockets of New York City to take her into, but I feel that I’ve left her in a good spot while I challenge myself with a new set of characters dealing with different issues relevant today.

I know you have written a standalonecan you tell me about it? Is it a thriller? Traditional detective story? Police story?

The new book is a fast-paced thriller. A young hotel employee, Grecia Galindo, has been framed for theft and offered the dubious choice between facing criminal charges (that would lead to her deportation) and enduring sexual harassment. Grecia courageously refuses to accept exploitation, and she is on her way to see her attorney when she is abducted from a Manhattan street. On the same morning, her experienced attorney is murdered. The attorney’s fiery young associate, Riley Wittman, discovers her body and narrowly avoids becoming the killer’s second victim. Now these two very different young women must fight for their lives. To survive, they’ll need to confront powerful adversaries, unravel a conspiracy, and face their own pasts in order to embrace the future.

While this is the intimate, elemental story of two women’s harrowing trials, their stories are inspired by the larger cultural shifts happening now: the plight of undocumented people and the traumatic experiences of women who have come forward to tell their stories in the #MeToo movement.

What's important to you in telling a story? What is the key your novel will revolve around?

I have a few non-negotiables when I start a new crime novel. I need a cast of diverse, complex characters with credible and surprising motivations. I need a context—a world—that I can expose for readers, one they may find unfamiliar but intriguing. And I need a purpose that transcends plot.

My purpose in this new novel is to examine the concepts of justice and identity. Grecia Galindo and Riley Wittman are very different, but they ask themselves the same questions: Are they, and should they be, limited by the circumstances of their birth? Must they follow in the path of their parents? Is justice ever truly blind?

Can you talk about your writing process? I have met and talked with so many authors through the years, but have never met any one who approaches the task as you do.

I had to laugh at this question, because as I read and began to address it, I was walking down Riverside Drive employing the process you’ve alluded to. I do not like to sit at a computer and stare at the screen as I compose a first draft. I have trouble pulling ideas out of my head when I’m in such a static position. I like to write in motion. In a recent New York Times review of two new book on Nietzsche, the reviewer, Stephen Smith, noted that “Almost all of the great philosophers—Socrates, Aristotle, the Stoics, Rousseau, Kant, Thoreau—were walkers whose ideas germinated only in motion.” While I certainly don’t count myself in their company, I do know that my best ideas emerge while I am walking. I’ve drafted three Claire Codella novels on the Notes app on my iPhone. I email the notes to myself, download them into Word files, and only then do I sit at the computer. The fun part of writing is the editing. That is where you get to shape and mold, like a word sculptor.

You came late to your writing career, what preconceptions did you have entering the world of publishing? What have you learned since Silent City was published?

Actually, I came to publishing pretty early the first time. I was 23 when my first novel, a literary novel, was published by Simon and Schuster. Back then, I was too young to understand how to handle my good fortune. Now, I’m far more realistic about what to expect. Not only is it difficult even for talented writers to get published, but it’s even harder to stay published book after book. Your career is largely dependent on your own efforts to promote yourself. I am grateful to have an audience, and my biggest joy now is connecting with readers and other writers. My expectations are far more realistic.

Who is inspirational to you as a writer? What other writers have helped you on your journey?

I am a very eclectic reader, but some of the writers I tend to go back to again and again are Jane Austen, Margaret Atwood, Charlotte Bronte (Jane Eyre), PD James, Patricia Highsmith, and Agatha Christie.

I have been helped by many people in the crime writing community, but a few stand out. First and foremost, SJ Rozan who has been a mentor and friend since I began writing Silent City. Wendy Corsi Staub has generously opened many doors for me (and been a riotously fun companion at many Bouchercons). Kristopher Zigorsky recognized and drew people’s attention to the uniqueness of the Codella series. And of course, Aunt Agatha’s was a huge supporter.

Difficult question—what is your favorite book, and why?

I’m going to say The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood. This book, published in 1986, was prescient—a startling reminder that our rights are as thin as the paper they are written on. Margaret Atwood never settles for lazy, predictable descriptions. And I admire the fact that she is a genre writer—one who deserves more acclaim than she’s received.

Carrie Smith is the author of the Claire Codella Mysteries from Crooked Lane Books, including Silent City, Forgotten City, and Unholy City. She is also the author of a literary novel Forget Harry. She is the recipient of three Hopwood Awards from the University of Michigan, a fellowship at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, and Killer Nashville’s Reader’s Choice Award. She is also a two-time finalist for Killer Nashville’s Silver Falchion Award and a finalist in Nimrod Magazine’s Katherine Anne Porter Prize for Fiction. By day, Carrie is senior vice president and publisher of Benchmark Education Company. She lives on the Upper West Side of Manhattan with her spouse and college-age twins.

Carrie Smith
Robin Agnew
carrie-smith
Thursday, 15 November 2018 16:47

Candace RobbI met Candace Robb when she was touring with her first book, The Apothecary Rose, in 1993. She has since written 10 Owen Archer books, three Margaret Kerr books, and is now writing the Kate Clifford books set in 15th-century York. With each one she approaches history via a unique character, in Kate’s case, she is a widow with adopted children who is working to pay off her dead husband’s debts and stay afloat amongst the political intrigue that was a huge part of her time. And watch outshe has a throwing axe in her skirt!

How did you come up with Kate Clifford? She's one of those characters that fully springs to life from page oneand she has such an interesting backstory as well.

Kate Clifford arrived in my life in a daydream, striding down Stonegate flanked by a pair of Irish wolfhounds, the tops of their heads level with her shoulders. I sensed the axe hidden in her skirts, saw wild dark hair escaping from her crispinette. She turned left onto High Petergate and stopped at a well-appointed house where an elderly woman greeted her as her mistress. How could I resist this vivid glimpse that left me asking, Who is she? I wrote The Service of the Dead to learn her story, then A Twisted Vengeance to tease out her mother’s tragedy.

And how about her cook, Berend? I know he's a favorite with readers (and with me). I liked that this new book fleshed him out more but I sense there's even more to know about him.

Berend’s arrival was more typical for me—he simply appeared in a scene, battle-scarred, muscular, kneading bread. I laughed and thought, He’s perfect for Kate’s household, and kept on typing. But by the end of the second book, I realized his depths, and could not resist testing them in A Murdered Peace, which feels very much to me like Berend’s book. The more I wrote, the more intrigued I became, and I cannot predict how the rest of his story might play out. He broke my heart as he broke Kate’s. Not that she can’t find joy, but he was far more important to her as a comrade than as a potential lover.

Irish Wolfhounds
A pair of Irish wolfhounds

Are you a dog person? I love Lille and Ghent, who are incredibly well trained. I know you are nothing if not an ace researcher, so how did you research the dogs and their training?

I’m an animal lover, and engage dog walkers in conversations about their wonderful companions, but my partner is strictly a cat person. Fortunately, one of my good friends is a canine expert, currently training law enforcement departments in her state about dealing with canines on both sides of the law: how to read them, how to calm them, etc. She spent hours on the phone with me explaining the differences in training and behavior between scent dogs—like many hounds, and coursing dogs—such as Lille and Ghent, who are Irish wolfhounds. We discussed what the dogs were likely to do in a variety of situations, and she often sent me links to videos backing up her explanations. I also had hands-on experience with Irish wolfhounds early on, when my cat’s veterinarian connected me with a couple in my neighborhood who live with a pair of Irish wolfhounds. They were wonderful about inviting me to visit. Sadly they’ve moved out into the country—but it’s a great move for the dogs.

The history of this book was new to me! I didn't know King Henry took over and imprisoned King Richard. Can you set up the historical background a little bit for readers?

The very short version: King Richard II banishes his cousin, Henry Bolingbroke, from the realm, but assures Henry that when his father, John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster dies, he will inherit the Lancastrian title. Upon Gaunt’s death, Richard breaks that promise, parceling out Henry’s inheritance to his supporters (he has become an unpopular king, especially among the powerful barons who expect him to cheat them as they have his cousin.) Henry takes advantage of Richard’s Irish campaign, when the king and the bulk of his army are in Ireland. He returns to England to claim his inheritance, landing in Yorkshire. The nobles not involved in the Irish campaign rise in support of Henry. As he crosses the country to confront Richard he collects a great army, which is perhaps what convinces Henry to reach further than the dukedom and take the crown from his cousin. He captures Richard, spins a tale of Richard willingly abdicating, and imprisons his cousin in Pontefract Castle. When some of Richard’s loyal followers try to rescue him, Henry realizes his throne will never be secure while his cousin lives. The timing of Richard’s death is still debated, but his corpse showed no signs of physical trauma. Henry claimed his cousin starved himself to death.

When you sit down to write a book, what's foremost in your mind? Do the characters and situations spring from your research? Do you come up with a story first?

Yes to all, at various times. The book I’m currently writing was inspired by a particular character, but as it’s the 12th in a series I immediately considered how it would fit in, what year it was in the series, and what was going on in history at that time that provided a background and perhaps even a motivation. And as I collected all this, the story began to grow and branch out in my mind. The 11th Owen Archer (A Conspiracy of Wolves), out next year, carried the burden of reviving a series, but the backstory of the book has been in my head for several years. As I mentioned above, The Service of the Dead began with Kate striding into my daydream.

I was interested in the last book by the Beguines, who are also in this book to a lesser extent. Can you talk about them a bit? So much of the history you share with readers is not as well known as some bits of well-covered history, a real strength of your novels.

Thank you! That’s one of the things I love about writing a historical crime series—rather than needing to provide a broad historical backdrop I can focus on more specific incidents or trends. The Beguines were part of a wider movement of lay devotion in the Low Countries. What was unique about the Beguines is that the communities were not endowed convents for cloistered women but were more in the spirit of women’s collectives who supported themselves by working outside or within their communal houses as healers, teachers, even weavers and sempsters. In many Beguine communities women could leave, perhaps marrying and having children, and then return when their families were mature. This very flexibility was controversial. The church tolerated them as long as they were “guided” by male confessors (priests, abbots, bishops).

You have been in the game for a long time now with several different series and different publishers. What have you learned in your long career about writing? About the book business? How has it changed since The Apothecary Rose was published in 1993?

Lessons about writing: Writing begets writing. If I don’t want to dry up, I must keep at it. When the characters start rebelling, pay attention. Never, ever force them to adhere to a “plan.” I prefer writing historical mysteries to writing historical novels that are, essentially, fictional biographies, because I like to play God with my main characters. I found it too frustrating to have no control over the fates of Alice Perrers (The King’s Mistress) or Joan of Kent (A Triple Knot).

The book business has changed so much I wouldn’t know where to begin. Once upon a time publishers sent authors on book tours, planned and financed by them, even if they weren’t celebrities or already mega-sellers. A new writer could quit her day job and focus on writing. Now, even when published by one of the Big Five [Hachette, HarperCollins, Macmillan, Penguin Random House, and Simon & Schuster], much of the marketing burden is on the writer. And we’re expected to engage with our readers in between books with social media. Fortunately I enjoy having more engagement throughout the year with my readers. It’s fun to share “medieval news” with them on Facebook, and Twitter helps me keep up with historians around the world, as well as fellow authors and readers.

I know Owen Archer is returning—yay! Can you fill readers in on Owen and his return?

I am delighted to be working with Severn House for the new Owen Archer mysteries—the first (11th in the series), A Conspiracy of Wolves, will be published in the UK in hardcover in April 2019, then in the US in August 2019. I’m working on the next.

And finally, can you name a book that was transformational for you? One that set you on your reading and/or writing path?

One? Too difficult! But I can name a cluster. Katherine, by Anya Seton, and Cecelia Holland’s The Firedrake, The Kings in Winter, Antichrist, and The Earl were revelations for me. They proved it was possible to write and successfully publish historical novels that focused on the history and culture rather than on whether or not the hero and heroine would have sex and live happily ever after. Although Katherine is a famous love story, it does not end happily, and there is much suffering and unpleasant but fascinating detail throughout.

The author who most inspired me to write was Ursula K. LeGuin. Her fiction was—is!—heartfelt and yet deeply anthropological, a wondrous combination. And it was during a workshop with Ursula that she suggested I shift from fantasy to historical fiction, that therein lay my unique talent. The rest is history! (Sorry, old joke.)

Candace Robb is a historian with a focus on 14th century Britain and historical crime fiction. She is the author behind the Owen Archer mysteries, the Margaret Kerr trilogy, and the Kate Clifford mysteries set in 15th century York. Under the pen name Emma Campion, she also authors historical novels about intriguing women from King Edward III's court.

Candace Robb on Making Mystery With History
Robin Agnew
candace-robb-on-making-mystery-with-history

I met Candace Robb when she was touring with her first book, The Apothocary Rose, in 1993. She has since written ten Owen Archer books, three Margaret Kerr books, and is now writing the Kate Clifford books set in 15th Century York. With each one she approaches history via a unique character, in Kate’s case, a widow with adopted children who is working to pay off her dead husband’s debts and stay afloat amongst the political intrigue that was a huge part of 15th century York. And watch out - she has a throwing axe in her skirt!

How did you come up with Kate Clifford? She's one of those characters that fully springs to life from page one - and she has so much interesting backstory as well.

Kate Clifford arrived in my life in a daydream, striding down Stonegate flanked by a pair of Irish wolfhounds, the tops of their heads level with her shoulders. I sensed the axe hidden in her skirts, saw wild dark hair escaping from her crispinette. She turned left onto High Petergate and stopped at a well-appointed house where an elderly woman greeted her as her mistress. How could I resist this vivid glimpse that left me asking, Who is she? I wrote The Service of the Dead to learn her story, then A Twisted Vengeance to tease out her mother’s tragedy.

And how about her cook, Berend? I know he's a favorite with readers (and with me). I liked that this new book fleshed him out more but I sense there's even more to know about him...

Berend’s arrival was more typical for me—he simply appeared in a scene, battle-scarred, muscular, kneading bread. I laughed and thought, he’s perfect for Kate’s household, and kept on typing. But by the end of the second book I realized his depths, and could not resist testing them in A Murdered Peace, which feels very much to me like Berend’s book. The more I wrote the more intrigued I became, and I cannot predict how the rest of his story might play out. He broke my heart as he broke Kate’s. Not that she can’t find joy—but he was far more important to her as a comrade than as a potential lover.

Are you a dog person? I love Lille and Ghent who are incredibly well trained. I know you are nothing if not an ace researcher, so how did you research the dogs and their training?

I’m an animal lover, and engage dog-walkers in conversations about their wonderful companions, but my partner is strictly a cat person. Fortunately, one of my good friends is a canine expert, currently training law enforcement departments in her state about dealing with canines on both sides of the law—how to read them, how to calm them, etc. She spent hours on the phone with me explaining the differences in training and behavior between scent dogs—like many hounds, and coursing dogs—such as Lille and Ghent, who are Irish wolfhounds. We discussed what the dogs were likely to do in a variety of situations, and she often sent me links to videos backing up her explanations. I also had hands-on experience with Irish wolfhounds early on, when my cat’s veterinarian connected me with a couple in my neighborhood who live with a pair of Irish wolfhounds. They were wonderful about inviting me to visit. Sadly they’ve moved out into the country—but it’s a great move for the dogs.

The history of this book was new to me! I didn't know Henry took over and imprisoned Richard. Can you set up the historical background a little bit for readers?

The very short version: King Richard II banishes his cousin, Henry Bolingbroke, from the realm, but assures Henry that when his father, John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster dies, he will inherit the Lancastrian title. Upon Gaunt’s death Richard breaks that promise, parceling out Henry’s inheritance to his supporters (he has become an unpopular king, especially among the powerful barons who expect him to cheat them as they have his cousin.) Henry takes advantage of Richard’s Irish campaign, when the king and the bulk of his army are in Ireland. He returns to England to claim his inheritance, landing in Yorkshire. The nobles not involved in the Irish campaign rise in support of Henry. As he crosses the country to confront Richard he collects a great army, which is perhaps what convinces Henry to reach further than the dukedom and take the crown from his cousin. He captures Richard, spins a tale of Richard willingly abdicating, and imprisons his cousin in Pontefract Castle. When some of Richard’s loyal followers try to rescue him, Henry realizes his throne will never be secure while his cousin lives. The timing of Richard’s death is still debated, but his corpse showed no signs of physical trauma. Henry claimed his cousin starved himself to death.

When you sit down to write a book, what's foremost in your mind? Do the characters and situations spring from your research? Do you come up with a story first?

Yes to all at various times. The book I’m currently writing was inspired by a particular character, but as it’s the 12th in a series I immediately considered how it would fit in, what year it was in the series and what was going on in history at that time that provided a background and perhaps even a motivation, and, as I collected all this the story began to grow and branch out in my mind. The 11th Owen Archer (A Conspiracy of Wolves), out next year, carried the burden of reviving a series, but the backstory of the book has been in my head for several years. As I mentioned above, The Service of the Dead began with Kate striding into my daydream.

I was interested in the last book by the Beguines, who are also in this book to a lesser extent. Can you talk about them a bit? So much of the history you share with readers is not as well known as some bits of well covered history, a real strength of your novels.

Thank you! That’s one of the things I love about writing a historical crime series—rather than needing to provide a broad historical backdrop I can focus on more specific incidents or trends. The Beguines were part of a wider movement of lay devotion in the Low Countries. What was unique about the Beguines is that the communities were not endowed convents for cloistered women but were more in the spirit of women’s collectives who supported themselves by working outside or within their communal houses as healers, teachers, even weavers and sempsters. In many Beguine communities women could leave, perhaps marrying and having children, and then return when their families were mature. This very flexibility was controversial. The Church tolerated them as long as they were “guided” by male confessors (priests, abbots, bishops).

You have been in the game for a long time now - several different series, different publishers - what have you learned in your long career about writing? About the book business? How has it changed since The Apothecary Rose was published in 1993?

Lessons about writing: Writing begets writing. If I don’t want to dry up, I must keep at it. When the characters start rebelling, pay attention. Never, ever force them to adhere to a “plan”. I prefer writing historical mysteries to writing historical novels that are, essentially, fictional biographies, because I like to play God with my main characters. I found it too frustrating to have no control over the fates of Alice Perrers (The King’s Mistress) or Joan of Kent (A Triple Knot).

The book business has changed so much I wouldn’t know where to begin. Once upon a time publishers sent authors on book tours, planned and financed by them, even if they weren’t celebrities or already mega sellers. A new writer could quit her day job and focus on writing. Now, even when published by one of the Big Five, much of the marketing burden is on the writer. And we’re expected to engage with our readers in between books with social media. Fortunately I enjoy having more engagement throughout the year with my readers. It’s fun to share “medieval news” with them on Facebook, and Twitter helps me keep up with historians around the world, as well as fellow authors and readers.

I know Owen Archer is returning - yay! Can you fill readers in on Owen and his return?

I am delighted to be working with Severn House for the new Owen Archer mysteries—the first (11th in the series), A Conspiracy of Wolves, will be published in the UK in hardcover on 30 April 2019, then in the US in hardcover on 1 August 2019, as well as the ebook . I’m working on the next.

And finally, can you name a book that was transformational for you? One that set you on your reading and/or writing path?

One? Too difficult! But I can name a cluster. Katherine, by Anya Seton, and Cecelia Holland’s The Firedrake, The Kings in Winter, Antichrist, and The Earl were revelations for me. They proved it was possible to write and successfully publish historical novels that focused on the history and culture rather than on whether or not the hero and heroine would have sex and live happily ever after. Although Katherine is a famous love story, it does not end happily, and there is much suffering and unpleasant but fascinating detail throughout.

The author who most inspired me to write was Ursula K. LeGuin. Her fiction was—is!—heart-felt and yet deeply anthropological, a wondrous combination. And it was during a workshop with Ursula that she suggested I shift from fantasy to historical fiction, that therein lay my unique talent. The rest is history! (Sorry, old joke.)